Movie scripts analyzed to depth including Scene-By-Scene Breakdown, Plot, Characters, Themes, Dialogue.

On May 16, 2021, Go Into The Story turns 13 years old — you can read the very first blog post here. I led with this paragraph:

Welcome to Go Into The Story! Right now, it’s nothing but a humble, threadbare blog, but I hope it will evolve into an active resource for aspiring screenwriters, as well as a community for anyone interested in storytelling and the creative life.

And evolve it did! To the point where it was recently named “Best of the Best” Scriptwriting Website in…


A week-long analysis of the script for the lauded indie movie by writer-director Kelly Reichardt.

Reading scripts. Absolutely critical to learn the craft of screenwriting. The focus of this bi-weekly series is a deep structural and thematic analysis of each script we read. Our daily schedule:

Monday: Scene-By-Scene Breakdown
Tuesday: Plot
Wednesday: Characters
Thursday: Themes
Friday: Dialogue
Saturday: Takeaways

Today: Themes.

Today: Themes.

I have this theory about theme. In two parts. First, a principle: Theme = Meaning. What does the story mean? Second, while there is almost always a Central Theme, there are multiple other Sub-Themes at play in…


Amazon Studios acquires action-adventure spec script “Valor” written by Jeff Chan and Andrew Rhymer. Via Deadline:

In Valor, a marauding warrior from a popular video game dies in a freak accident. He is reincarnated in our world and discovers the god he’s always worshipped turns out to be a 13-year-old Asian kid from New Jersey adjusting to life with a single parent. The project is billed as a four-quadrant family movie, repping 87North’s first foray in that space. Word is Amazon picked up the project for high six figures.

This is the third consecutive six-to-seven figure deal for a spec script in the last 12 days joining Sharp and Stay Frosty.

Chan and Rhymer are repped by Verve and Anonymous Content.

By my count, this is the 15th spec script deal in 2021.

There were 7 spec script deals year-to-date in 2020.


Part 5: Developing the Spec Script

“You’re basically only asking three questions: how easy is it to market, how broad is the appeal, and how much would it cost to make? If the answers are very, very, and a lot, then it’s definitely a studio movie.”

Story prep can look a bit like Carrie’s wall in “Homeland”. A writer’s reps can help as a “sounding board”.

I’m guessing that perhaps 90% of the people who follow this blog at some point in their lives will write a spec script. And the other 10% are involved in buying and selling them. In light of that fact, last year I interviewed a top manager and some Hollywood screenwriters about the ins and…


Written by Sam Mendes, Krysty Wilson-Cairns

Here is the first 9-minutes of the movie — one continuous shot:

Note the number of lines per paragraph of scene description: 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 2, 1, 3, 3, 3. This reflects the contemporary approach to handling action description: Break up paragraphs into bite-sized chunks, typically no more than 3 lines per paragraph. This makes for an easier read.

Download the script here.

FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY!

Page One is a daily Go Into The Story series featuring the first page of notable movie scripts from the classic era to contemporary times. Comparing them is an excellent way to study a variety of writing styles and see how professional writers start a story.

For more Page One posts, go here.

You may follow the daily conversation on Twitter as I cross-post there: @GoIntoTheStory.


A week-long analysis of the script for the lauded indie movie by writer-director Kelly Reichardt.

Reading scripts. Absolutely critical to learn the craft of screenwriting. The focus of this bi-weekly series is a deep structural and thematic analysis of each script we read. Our daily schedule:

Monday: Scene-By-Scene Breakdown
Tuesday: Plot
Wednesday: Characters
Thursday: Themes
Friday: Dialogue
Saturday: Takeaways

Today: Characters.

Characters are the players in our stories. They participate in scenes, move the plot forward through action and dialogue, influence each other, evolve and change. Each has their own distinct backstory, personality, world view, and voice. …


“I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore!”

The WGA has an annual honor called The Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award. And even though it’s for writers who work in TV, where Chayefsky ruled during its so-called “Golden Age,” there is no piece of writing that displays Chayefsky’s brilliance than this famous monologue in the movie Network (1976). In this scene, newscaster Howard Beale (Peter Finch) goes on a tirade about contemporary life that is as relevant today as it was over 30 years ago.

Here is the script version of the scene:


Twitter threads uploaded by professional screenwriters, TV writers, and producers on a wide variety of subjects.

On May 16, 2021, Go Into The Story turns 13 years old — you can read the very first blog post here. I led with this paragraph:

Welcome to Go Into The Story! Right now, it’s nothing but a humble, threadbare blog, but I hope it will evolve into an active resource for aspiring screenwriters, as well as a community for anyone interested in storytelling and the creative life.

And evolve it did! To the point where it was recently named “Best of the…


Exploring three keys to writing multilinear screenplays.

The movie ‘Traffic’ (2000) is an example of a ‘multilinear’ story.

From an anonymous reader:

I was curious about stories which follow multiple characters, each with their own plight to overcome in the overlapping storyline. I suppose my question is more than one… which films are good examples of this and the second being what are tips to remember when assuming this format? What are issues that a writer should be concerned with, i.e. things to avoid when writing multiple main characters? I also assume this is suitable for both Drama and other genres.

A good starting point for your research might be this…


Screenplay by Will Berson & Shaka King, story by Will Berson & Shaka King and Kenneth Lucas & Keith Lucas

The movie version of the opening:

Download the script here.

FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY!

Page One is a daily Go Into The Story series featuring the first page of notable movie scripts from the classic era to contemporary times. Comparing them is an excellent way to study a variety of writing styles and see how professional writers start a story.

For more Page One posts, go here.

You may follow the daily conversation on Twitter as I cross-post there: @GoIntoTheStory.

Scott Myers

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